Rain and thunderstorms drench the mid-Atlantic, but rain and snow elsewhere clear out

With the exception of South Carolina, most parts of the northern United States are expected to be warmer than normal for much of the coming week, according to the National Weather Service. A cold…

With the exception of South Carolina, most parts of the northern United States are expected to be warmer than normal for much of the coming week, according to the National Weather Service.

A cold front from the Great Lakes and Midwest moved eastward Sunday, kicking up thunderstorms and heavy rain throughout the mid-Atlantic and the Mid-Atlantic states. Much of the rain will clear out Monday.

The rest of the week will be on the cool side. There will be dry weather in South Carolina through Tuesday, but a cold front should push east of the state by late Tuesday, bringing scattered showers and thunderstorms to the area. Storms are likely across the southern and eastern Plains Wednesday and Thursday.

According to the National Weather Service, the high temperature in Virginia in the afternoon would likely range from the low 60s Monday and Tuesday, the high in the 70s Wednesday, and the mid- to upper 70s Thursday. Highs in South Carolina, Georgia and North Carolina should range from the mid-60s to low 70s each day.

Mostly cloudy, cool weather is forecast for much of the eastern half of the country.

Florence, the hurricane that dumped record rain over the Carolinas and Virginia, has completely lost its tropical characteristics. The cyclone has weakened to a tropical depression and is moving slowly to the northwest, so it will weaken to a tropical depression Tuesday.

Parts of the Southeast and Mid-Atlantic could see rain early next week, but it is unclear what’s in store.

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