Philippines’ first female mayor has no plans to run for president

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte will seek reelection in 2022, his spokesman said on Wednesday, continuing a decades-long family tradition that will prevent him from challenging his eldest daughter, Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte-Carpio, in…

Philippines’ first female mayor has no plans to run for president

Philippine President Rodrigo Duterte will seek reelection in 2022, his spokesman said on Wednesday, continuing a decades-long family tradition that will prevent him from challenging his eldest daughter, Davao City Mayor Sara Duterte-Carpio, in the race.

Duterte-Carpio, the first Philippine woman to be elected mayor, told a group of donors in Davao City on Wednesday that she will run for mayor again in 2022. Duterte-Carpio’s father and Duterte’s mother were both Philippines governors, and the eldest Duterte sister, Nora, is the country’s vice president.

President Duterte’s office announced that the president had already filed his nomination form for the 2022 election for the Senate and would run for reelection as a senator. The President has not yet confirmed what platform he will run on next year, although recent interviews with the press suggested that he intends to run as a “rural/tribal” candidate. Duterte-Carpio’s office also confirmed that she will not run for president.

Duterte-Carpio was elected mayor of Davao City by nearly three-quarters of the city’s electorate, and has been hailed by many as a modern-day pioneer. She spent her days on the job running a fire department that included providing basic civil services to the region’s poorest inhabitants, and eventually won a growing share of women’s votes. Despite Davao City’s overwhelming support, Sara Duterte-Carpio will lose to her dad in 2022 because of the Philippines’ system of senatorial succession, which gives the first family the advantage of running for the same office multiple times. The outgoing president also suffers from the disadvantage of not being a true dynast, in a country with very few political dynasties.

But given that Duterte is nearly a household name in the Philippines, and made his name fighting crime and corruption in Davao City, which he had ruled as mayor for more than two decades, it’s a safe bet he will run. Duterte’s signature campaign issue, anti-drug hysteria, has helped him inspire sympathy among many voters. But the father-daughter combination has raised eyebrows among feminists in the Philippines, and has been described as an a “man-child.”

Read the full story at The New York Times.

Related

Filipino military orders women to cover their hair, or risk being shot

Leave a Comment